NEWS

As Hollywood strikes roll on, are shows premiering this fall



Hollywood has been in limbo these last few months. It’s been especially tough for everyone who earns their living making TV and film. But it also means viewers will start seeing just how that is impacting the fall network lineup. A prolonged strike — still ongoing — will inevitably have that effect and the work stoppage has reshaped prime time in significant ways.

If the studios are unable to resolve the strikes soon, their streaming pipeline will slow to a trickle. We’ll know more when we see just how many (or few) premieres there are this winter. Until then, here’s a look at some offerings in the first few weeks of the fall TV season, in order of their premieres

“The Changeling” (Sept. 8 on Apple TV+): The eight-part drama stars LaKeith Stanfield as a new father who finds his life spinning out of control. It’s adapted from a novel that has been described as a “punchy cocktail of modern parenting and ancient magic” wherein the “anxieties of fatherhood, race and money are dwarfed by otherworldly peril.”

“The Other Black Girl” (Sept. 13 on Hulu): Nella is a Black editorial assistant at a New York publishing house who is struggling to work her way up the corporate ladder and retain her dignity along the way. When the all-white company hires another Black employee, she’s initially thrilled. But is this newcomer friend or foe? A surreal thriller about microaggressions, office politics and taking over the world (or at least a small corner of it), the series is based on the bestseller by Zakiya Dalila Harris, who also has a writing credit on the show.

“The Super Models” (Sept. 20 on Apple TV+): The supermodel era was defined by Naomi Campbell, Cindy Crawford, Linda Evangelista and Christy Turlington, who captured the public’s imagination in a way that hasn’t been replicated since. The women sit for new interviews in this docuseries. “Donyale Luna: Supermodel” (Sept. 13 on Max) premieres a week earlier as a documentary about the life and career of the first Black model featured on the cover of Harper’s Bazaar and Vogue.

“Young Love” (Sept. 21 on Max): Created by Matthew Cherry, the warmly comedic animated series expands upon Cherry’s Oscar-winning short “Hair Love,” about a Black father who learns the ins and outs of styling his young daughter’s hair. Kid Cudi and Issa Rae voice the parents.

 “The Continental: From the World of John Wick” (Sept. 22 on Peacock): The crime series is a prequel spinoff to the ultraviolent “John Wick” movie franchise and focuses on the Continental hotel chain, which serves as a safe haven for assassins. The show is set in the ‘70s.

“Gen V” (Sept. 29 on Amazon): A spinoff of Amazon’s popular and very satirical superhero series “The Boys,” the new show takes place at superhero college where powers are injected rather than inherited.

“Lupin” (Oct. 5 on Netflix): As a character, the gentleman thief known as Lupin falls somewhere between Sherlock Holmes and Robin Hood. As played with broad-shouldered grace by French actor Omar Sy, he has charisma to spare.

“Frasier” (Oct. 12 on Paramount+): They have revived my beloved “Frasier” and I wish I could say this was good news. Alas, Kelsey Grammer is the only cast member returning. RIP John Mahoney. But also: RIP the erudite ludicrousness that was the Brothers Crane, aka Frasier and Niles. The new series (10 episodes in all) has Frasier returning to Boston and living with Freddy, his now-adult son. (The first two episodes of the season will also air Oct. 17 on CBS.)

“Lessons in Chemistry” (Oct. 13 on Apple TV+): Brie Larson stars as a frustrated 1960s scientist who lands a gig hosting a TV cooking show, which she uses as a platform to educate viewers about chemistry. Adapted from the zippy 2022 novel of the same name. Beau Bridges also stars.

“Fellow Travelers” (Oct. 29 on Showtime): Part epic love story, part political thriller, the limited series is about the “clandestine romance of two very different men who meet in McCarthy-era Washington,” and follows the pair over the next four decades. Starring Matt Bomer (“White Collar”) and Jonathan Bailey (“Bridgerton”).

Tribune News Service

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button

gates of olympus