NEWS

Long-planned supportive housing development opens in Elgin


A long-planned supportive housing development that will serve people with disabilities, mental health issues or who are at risk of homelessness held its grand opening Thursday on the east side of Elgin.

Hanover Landing, a 40-unit development with on-site social services, broke ground a little over a year ago after being in the planning stages for about seven years.

State Rep. Anna Moeller of Elgin called the development “a triumph of empathy and purpose.”

“In a world where progress often seems measured by economic indicators and technological achievements, it is truly remarkable to witness the birth of a project that centers on the well-being of the most vulnerable among us,” Moeller said.

The project’s origins go back to 2015 when Hanover Township established a mental health housing task force, which identified a need for service-enriched housing for residents with disabilities and special needs. The task force partnered with UPholdings, an affordable housing development and management company that partners with communities.

UPholdings President Jessica Hoff Berzac said the project was completed on time and within budget.

“Housing is a human right,” Berzac said. “With the creation of affordable housing, we actually see communities and perceptions change.”

Residents of Hanover Landing live independently as tenants while being offered on- and off-site resources tailored to their needs, though they’re not obligated to utilize the services.


        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

UPholdings works with community partners, including the Ecker Center and Hanover Township, to provide the services.

Fifteen people have already moved into the building, which offers furnished one-bedroom, one-bath apartments. Residents so far range in age from a 20-year-old to someone in their 60s.

The $16.5 million project was paid for with Cook and Kane counties’ HOME funds, Illinois Housing Development Authority gap funds and tax equity funds.

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        



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