General

Volunteers wanted for cervical cancer screening study

Volunteers wanted for cervical cancer screening study thumbnail

The department of health, in collaboration with Walter Sisulu University and Human Reproduction Programme, is calling for volunteers to take part in a cervical cancer screening and treatment algorithms (Cesta) study using human papillomavirus (HPV) testing at Frere Hospital.

The department of health, in collaboration with Walter Sisulu University and Human Reproduction Programme, is calling for volunteers to take part in a cervical cancer screening and treatment algorithms (Cesta) study using human papillomavirus (HPV) testing at Frere Hospital.

Image: MICHAEL PINYANA

The study is looking for women living with HIV/Aids between the ages of 25 and 54. The project is co-ordinated through the International Agency for Research on Cancer under the World Health Organisation.

According to health department spokesperson Yonela Dekeda, HPV is a common sexually transmitted virus that can infect the cervix.

If left untreated, the infection can develop into cervical cancer.

“Screen and test approaches have been proven to be useful in low to middle countries, where women are screened for cervical cancer precursors and if results are positive, they receive treatment on the same day,” Dekeda said.

“Frere Hospital has its own HPV DNA machine; patients are screened and receive the results within an hour.

Cesta principal investigator and Frere gynaecologist  Dr Nondumiso Ngxola said: “One of the major objectives of the trial is to offer screen and test; with this approach the department is trying to find the best possible algorithm for our population.

“In this trial, an HPV test is done which is similar to a pap smear test, and even the procedure of obtaining the sample from a woman is the same.

“With this HPV test, the results are available within an hour,” Ngxola said.

She said the results of the study would help them improve the Cest algorithm which would then allow them to provide better screening services in the future.

READ:  Free Digital Summer Camp from GIGIL STEM Kits

Ngxola said the study was also being conducted in Durban and Senegal, with the South African leg of the study focusing on HIV/Aids-positive women.

“The benefits are that almost everyone who comes through the trial is receiving treatment.

“The treatment that we’re using is something that has been tested. We’re not testing treatments. Everything we are using is something that has been approved.”

Dekeda said: “Depending on the results and further assessment, women will receive treatment the same day and this is a major breakthrough in cervical cancer prevention.”

Women who meet the criteria can apply at the obstetrics and gynaecology department at Frere Hospital during office hours.

According to the Cancer Association of SA (Cansa), cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among South African women, but is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths for women in the country.

In their lifetime, one in 42 women risks contracting cervical cancer.

HPV is the primary cause of cervical cancer which puts HIV/Aids-positive women at increased risk because of their weakened immune systems.

Symptoms include abnormal bleeding between periods, heavier and longer menstrual periods, vaginal discharge, vaginal bleeding or pain during intercourse or after menopause, and increased urinary frequency.

The Cansa website recommends women schedule regular pap smears to detect possible cancer as early as possible.

DispatchLIVE

Read More

Learn More: latest news on stimulus,u visa latest news,o panneerselvam latest news,g dragon latest news,latest news about stimulus check,j cole latest news,p chidambaram latest news,hepatitis b latest news,sarah g latest news,l&t latest news,p square latest news,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *